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Imagine

Updated: Jun 16, 2022

I am the way, the truth, and the life. (John 14:6)


Imagine there’s no countries, it isn’t hard to do Nothing to kill or die far, and no religion too. Imagine all the people living life in peace. You, you may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one. I hope some day you’ll join us and the world will be as one. (Yoko Ono and John Lennon)


OR


Imagine there’s no parties, it isn’t hard to do. No red or blue to follow, to push what’s right for you. Imagine all the people living life in peace, No, no labels right or left, just what’s best for everyone Walking the ways of Jesus and all will have won.


Sorry, John and Yoko, but religion is exactly what we need in this crazy, vitriolic, hateful election time. Imagine if all of us, public figures as well as us ordinary blue and red people, were to be guided by God’s principles—the God of forgiveness, gracious and merciful, slow to become angry, and rich in unfailing love (Nehemiah 9:17)—such as “do unto others…” and “love your neighbor as…”


These days we often talk about “the other” in terms of race, class, country, or culture. Many of us talk in terms of listening to them, trying to understand, and attempting to work toward inclusion and justice.


What about considering that the other may be those of another political persuasion or view of how to solve social problems? The truth is, this “other” has been with us since Alexander Hamilton’s Federalists and Thomas Jefferson’s Republicans locked horns in the late 1700s. Imagine our democracy having made more progress since then. Is there a place at the table for the other?


Imagine if Jesus were sitting at the table and the other was not present. He probably wouldn’t upset the table, but I’m guessing he would upset all those present by saying in a stern voice something like, “For my father’s sake, children, get your act together. There’ll be no more discussion on this issue”—say, for example, immigration—“until everyone has a voice here.” (Maybe Bush and Obama heard his message because, as I understand it, they agreed on a comprehensive new immigration plan. Just couldn’t get a divided Congress to follow through on it.)


Progress in solving our national issues will not come by simply getting our massive, controlling party machines into power, but by the hard work of give and take around a table, with Jesus there in spirit. Compromise is what progress in politics is all about. We must pray it happens and never lose hope.


You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one. I hope someday you’ll join us, and the world will be as one.

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